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Mudhoji II Bhonsle

Mudhoji II Bhonsle

Mudhoji II Bhonsle, also known as Appa Sahib, ruled the Kingdom of Nagpur in central India from 1816-1818. His reign coincided with the Third Anglo-Maratha War between the Maratha Confederacy and the United Kingdom, which ended with the defeat of the Marathas.

Mudhoji II Bhonsle

Mudhoji II Bhonsle, also known as Appa Sahib, ruled the Kingdom of Nagpur in central India from 1816-1818. His reign coincided with the Third Anglo-Maratha War between the Maratha Confederacy and the United Kingdom, which ended with the defeat of the Marathas.

On the death of Raghoji II in 1816, his son Parsaji was soon supplanted and murdered by Mudhoji II. A treaty of alliance providing for the maintenance of a subsidiary force by the British was signed in this year, a British resident having been appointed to the Nagpur court since 1799. In 1817, on the outbreak of war between the British and the Peshwa, Appa Sahib threw off his cloak of friendship, and accepted and embassy and title from the Peshwa. His troops attacked the British, and were defeated in the action at Sitabaldi, and a second time round Nagpur city. As a result of these battles, the remaining portion of Berar and the territories in the Narmada valley were ceded to the British. Appa Sahib was reinstated to the throne, but shortly afterwards was discovered to be again conspiring, and was deposed and forwarded to Allahabad in custody, while the British placed his successor Raghoji III, a minor, on the Nagpur throne. On the way, however, he bribed his guards and escaped, first to the Mahadeo Hills and subsequently to the Punjab. Mudhoji died in 1840 while in exile. Checkout unsecuredloans4u co uk for more details.

The Bhonsle or Bhonsale (pronounced Bhoslay) were a prominent Maratha clan who served as rulers of several states in India .

The most prominent member of the clan was Shivaji, the founder of the Maratha empire. His successors ruled as maharajas from their capital at Satara, although de facto rule of the empire passed to the Peshwas, the Marathas’ hereditary chief ministers, during the reign of Shahu I.

In addition to the Bhonsle Maharajas of Satara, rulers of the Bhonsle clan established themselves at Thanjavur in Tamil Nadu in the 17th century, and at Nagpur and Kolhapur in modern-day Maharashtra in the 18th century. The Bhonsle of Thanjavur were descendants of Sivaji’s half-brother Venkaji, while the Bhonsle of Satara and Kolhapur were descended from Sivaji’s sons, Sambhaji and Rajaram.

After the British defeat of the Marathas in the Third Anglo-Maratha War in 1818, the Marathas were forced to accept British rule. The four Bhonsle dynasties continued as rulers of their princely states, acknowledging British sovereignty while retaining local autonomy. The states of Nagpur, Thanjavur, and Satara came under direct British rule in the mid-nineteenth century when their rulers died without male heirs; Kolhapur continued as a princely state until India’s independence in 1947, when the rulers acceded to the Indian government.

n 1803 Raghoji II joined the Peshwas against the British in the Second Anglo-Maratha War. The British prevailed, and Raghoji was forced to cede Cuttack, Sambalpur, and part of Berar. After Raghoji II’s death in 1816, his son Parsaji was deposed and murdered by Mudhoji II. Despite the fact that he had entered into a treaty with the British in the same year, Mudhoji joined the Peshwa in the Third Anglo-Maratha War in 1817 against the British, but was forced to cede the rest of Berar to the Nizam of Hyderabad, and parts of Saugor and Damoh, Mandla, Betul, Seoni and the Narmada valley to the British after suffering a defeat at Sitabuldi in modern-day Nagpur city. Mudhoji was deposed after a temporary restoration to the throne, after which the British placed Raghoji III the grandchild of Raghoji II, on the throne. During the rule of Raghoji III (which lasted till 1840), the region was administered by a British resident. In 1853, the British took control of Nagpur after Raghoji III died without leaving an heir. From 1853 to 1861, the Nagpur Province (which consisted of the present Nagpur region, Chhindwara, and Chhatisgarh) became part of the Central Provinces and Berar and came under the administration of a commissioner under the British central government, with Nagpur as its capital. Berar was added in 1903.

source: http://swapnapurtigroup.com/realestate/nagpurhistory.htm